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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 35-38

Stereotactic navigation in orbital decompression surgery – Does it shorten operative time and improve outcomes?


Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Bradford W Lee
Division of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/tjo.tjo_60_21

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Purpose: Stereotactic navigation is being increasingly used for orbital decompression (OD). Recent studies have cited clinical benefits of navigation including greater proptosis reduction but have differed regarding effects on operative time. This study aimed to evaluate navigated vs. non-navigated OD with respect to operative time and proptosis reduction. Materials and Methods: Retrospective nonrandomized comparative trial of navigated vs. nonnavigated OD. Operative time and proptosis reduction were recorded and analyzed for all patients. Results: A total of 30 orbital decompressions were included; 14 were performed with stereotactic navigation (SN), and 16 were performed without SN. On average, the SN group took 19 minutes longer for 3-wall decompressions (p = 0.185), 25 minutes shorter for balanced decompressions (p = 0.025), and 18 minutes longer (p = 0.067) for lateral wall decompressions. Mean proptosis reduction (PR) in 3-wall decompressions was greater in the SN group (p = 0.02). Among balanced wall decompressions, mean PR was 4.25 mm and 3.67 mm for the SN and non-SN groups (p = 0.30), respectively. For lateral wall decompressions, mean PR was 2.63 mm with SN and 2.50 mm without SN (p = 0.45). Conclusions: This study showed no difference in operative times between navigated and non-navigated OD, although empirical experience showed variable times required for registration and intraoperative troubleshooting of the navigation system. This study also found that navigation increased proptosis reduction for all types of OD. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to better understand the impact of navigation technology on operative times and surgical outcomes.


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